Category: socio-cultural Issues

Making Positive Impact Through Music

Making Positive Impact Through Music Music educators have a role in facilitating responses, music learning and teaching in relation to hate and bigotry occurring throughout contemporary society.  Valerie Strauss suggests that “The first thing teachers should do when school starts is talk about hatred in America” and provides numerous resources for doing so. Music plays an important role in helping people make sense of, meaning, of, and respond to the world. Music programs can play an

Performing Music with Digital Media

Check out Sight Machine by Trevor Paglen, Kronos Quartet, and Obscura Digital commissioned by Cantor Arts Center (recently featured on WIRED): You can also read a New York Times article by Julie Baumgardner about Sight Machine and themes of the project.  I find this collaboration interesting for some of the following reasons in relation to music learning and teaching: it explores socio-cultural issues through the arts it is driven by artistic inquiry  it combines digital media and

Journal of Popular Music Education and Popular Music in Music Education

The first volume and issue of the new Journal of Popular Music Education is available for free online. Congrats to editors Bryan Powell and Gareth Dylan Smith, who were a driving force in the journal coming into existence. Some Context on Popular Music in Music Education People sometimes have the misperception that engaging with popular music in music programs is new. It is not. You can find examples of music educators in the US discussing

Expanding ensemble repertoire for diversity and inclusion

Phrases such as “the repertoire is the curriculum” have a sense of truth (though I think this is an extremely limited way of conceputalizing curriculum). Here I’m talking about the hidden curriculum, that which students learn through their engagement in school but that educators or schools do not make explicit in written or spoken form. A quick scan through an ensemble program’s repertoire can reveal much about the hidden curriculum that students experience. One way of

Rap, rhyme, and rhythm for music teaching and learning

The following Vox video Rapping, deconstructed: The best rhymers of all time, produced by Estelle Caswell, provides an introduction to the ways that rap musicians use rhyme and rhythm in their music and traces changes over time. (NOTE: The video contains language from some of the music that is not appropriate in many school settings). Take a look & listen and consider any connections you might make to existing or potential music curricula: What implications might this

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